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Argaw Ambelu   Dr.  Senior Scientist or Principal Investigator 
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Argaw Ambelu published an article in November 2018.
Top co-authors See all
Jamie Bartram

117 shared publications

Water Institute, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

G. Du Laing

112 shared publications

Department of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium

Esayas Alemayehu

18 shared publications

Jimma institute of technology, Jimma University, Ethiopia

Samuel Godfrey

16 shared publications

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), UNICEF Ethiopia, P.O. Box 1169, Addis Ababa 1169, Ethiopia

Ryan Cronk

12 shared publications

Water Institute, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

12
Publications
15
Reads
4
Downloads
10
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2014 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
11
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Improving Monitoring and Water Point Functionality in Rural Ethiopia Carmen Anthonj, Lisa Fleming, Ryan Cronk, Samuel Godfrey, Ar... Published: 07 November 2018
Water, doi: 10.3390/w10111591
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
This study examines the patterns, trends, and factors associated with functional community water points in rural Ethiopia and identifies potential areas of improvement in terms of practitioner response to functionality and functionality monitoring. It was part of an integrated WaSH and nutrition program implemented by UNICEF Ethiopia and the Government of Ethiopia. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted to collect WaSH-related data in communities and WaSH committees from four community-based nutrition (CBN) program groupings in Ethiopia. In all areas, CBN was implemented, but only in less than half of the areas, a WaSH intervention was implemented. Seventy-three representative kebeles, comprising 30 intervention and 43 control communities, were surveyed. Two structured surveys were conducted. The ‘community survey’ addressed community water points and their functionality and the main areas for improvement needed. The ‘WaSH committee survey’ investigated technical and management aspects of water points and their functionality. Data were analyzed using bivariate regression to identify community characteristics and management practices associated with functionality of water points and explore opportunities to improve water point functionality and monitoring. In the communities, 65% of water points were functional. Eighty percent of communities had a WaSH committee. The WaSH committee members reported that the most used water point types were protected dug wells and boreholes, and that 80% of their water points were functional. India Mark II pumps were more likely to be functional and communities with longer established WaSH committees had higher water point functionality. Communities suggested that the key factors for water point sustainability were improving water quality and water pressure, reducing water collection time, and speeding up repair times. Taking community leaders’ ‘priority lists’ into consideration offers sustainable opportunities for demand-driven, adaptive and targeted design and implementation of rural water supply programs, which, if they include the grassroots level as key informants and actors of change, can succeed. Interventions should integrate the ‘voice’ of the community, the WaSH committees, and other stakeholders and thereby facilitate transdisciplinary approaches at different stages of program management (planning, monitoring, and evaluation). This would help closing the knowledge to action gap and improve policy, programming, practice, and service delivery.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation A survey of work-related injuries among building construction workers in southwestern Ethiopia Abate Lette, Argaw Ambelu, Tadesse Getahun, Seblework Mekone... Published: 01 November 2018
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, doi: 10.1016/j.ergon.2018.06.010
DOI See at publisher website
Article 3 Reads 1 Citation Health Risk Perceptions Are Associated with Domestic Use of Basic Water and Sanitation Services—Evidence from Rural Ethi... Carmen Anthonj, Lisa Fleming, Samuel Godfrey, Argaw Ambelu, ... Published: 26 September 2018
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, doi: 10.3390/ijerph15102112
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
We examine factors associated with the use of basic water supply and sanitation services as part of an integrated community-based nutrition programme which included a drinking water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) intervention and emphasise findings related to health risk perceptions. Data were collected from 2658 households in four regions in Ethiopia with a cross-sectional survey in WaSH intervention areas, as well as in control areas, where the intervention was not implemented. The data were analysed using bivariate and multivariable regression analysis. Awareness of health risk factors related to inadequate WaSH was high in the programme area. The use of basic water and sanitation services was associated with several health risk perceptions: Perceiving water quality as good increased the odds of using basic water services as opposed to believing the water quality was poor (OR 3.94; CI 3.06–5.08; p ≤ 0.001). Believing that drinking unsafe water was the main cause for diarrhoea increased the odds of using basic water services (OR 1.48; CI 1.20–1.81; p ≤ 0.001). In the WaSH intervention group, the use of basic sanitation was more likely than in the control group. The use of basic sanitation was associated with households who had previously received sanitation training, as opposed to such who had not (OR 1.55; CI 1.22–1.97; p ≤ 0.001). Perceiving dirty space as the main cause of diarrhoea (OR 1.81; CI 1.50–2.19; p ≤ 0.001), and privacy when using a latrine (OR 2.00; CI 1.67–2.40; p ≤ 0.001), were associated with higher odds of using basic sanitation. Households that indicated a disadvantage of owning a latrine was maintenance costs were less likely to use basic sanitation (OR 0.49; CI 0.38–0.63; p ≤ 0.001). Risk perceptions were important determinants of use of basic services. The findings point to risk perceptions motivating the application of positive WaSH-related and health-protective behaviours. This suggests that well-designed health risk communication strategies may be effective for engaging households in healthy WaSH behaviour.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Health Risk Perceptions Are Associated with Domestic Use of Basic Water and Sanitation Services-Evidence from Rural Ethi... Carmen Anthonj, Lisa Fleming, Samuel Godfrey, Argaw Ambelu, ... Published: 26 September 2018
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health,
PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
We examine factors associated with the use of basic water supply and sanitation services as part of an integrated community-based nutrition programme which included a drinking water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) intervention and emphasise findings related to health risk perceptions. Data were collected from 2658 households in four regions in Ethiopia with a cross-sectional survey in WaSH intervention areas, as well as in control areas, where the intervention was not implemented. The data were analysed using bivariate and multivariable regression analysis. Awareness of health risk factors related to inadequate WaSH was high in the programme area. The use of basic water and sanitation services was associated with several health risk perceptions: Perceiving water quality as good increased the odds of using basic water services as opposed to believing the water quality was poor (OR 3.94; CI 3.06⁻5.08; p ≤ 0.001). Believing that drinking unsafe water was the main cause for diarrhoea increased the odds of using basic water services (OR 1.48; CI 1.20⁻1.81; p ≤ 0.001). In the WaSH intervention group, the use of basic sanitation was more likely than in the control group. The use of basic sanitation was associated with households who had previously received sanitation training, as opposed to such who had not (OR 1.55; CI 1.22⁻1.97; p ≤ 0.001). Perceiving dirty space as the main cause of diarrhoea (OR 1.81; CI 1.50⁻2.19; p ≤ 0.001), and privacy when using a latrine (OR 2.00; CI 1.67⁻2.40; p ≤ 0.001), were associated with higher odds of using basic sanitation. Households that indicated a disadvantage of owning a latrine was maintenance costs were less likely to use basic sanitation (OR 0.49; CI 0.38⁻0.63; p ≤ 0.001). Risk perceptions were important determinants of use of basic services. The findings point to risk perceptions motivating the application of positive WaSH-related and health-protective ours. This suggests that well-designed health risk communication strategies may be effective for engaging households in healthy WaSH behaviour.
PREPRINT-CONTENT 0 Reads 0 Citations Climate Resilience Index as a tool to explore households' resilience to climate change-induced shocks in Dinki watershed... Mengistu Asmamaw, Argaw Ambelu, Seid Tiku Mereta Published: 01 August 2018
Scientific Communication and Education, doi: 10.1101/382358
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
This study assessed households' resilience to climate change-induced shocks in Dinki watershed, northcentral highlands of Ethiopia. The data were collected through cross-sectional survey conducted on 288 households, six focus group discussions and 15 key informant interviews. The Climate Resilience Index (CRI) and the Livelihood Resilience Index (LRI) based on the three-resilience capacities (3Ds) frame, using absorptive, adaptive and transformative, were used to measure households' resilience to climate change-induced shocks on agro-ecological unit of analysis. Findings indicate that the CRI and the resilience capacities based on the indexed scores of major components clearly differentiated the study communities in terms of their agro-ecological zones. Specifically, the LRI score showed that absorptive capacity (0.495) was the leading contributing factor to resilience followed by adaptive (0.449) and transformative (0.387) capacities. Likewise, the midland was relatively more resilient with a mean index value of 0.461. The study showed that access to and use of livelihood resources, such as farmlands and livestock holdings, diversity of income sources, infrastructure and social capital were determinants of households' resilience. In general, it might be due to their exposure to recurrent shocks coupled with limited adaptive capacities including underdeveloped public services, poor livelihood diversification practices, among others, the study communities showed minimal resilience capacity with a mean score of 0.44. Thus, in addition to short-term buffering strategies, intervention priority focusing on both adaptive and transformative capacities, particularly focusing on most vulnerable localities and constrained livelihood strategies, would contribute to ensure long-term resilience in the study communities.
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 12 Reads 0 Citations Freeze desalination as point of use water treatment technology: A case of chromium (VI) removal from water Fekadu Melak Assaye, Argaw Ambelu, Gijs Du Laing, Esayas Ale... Published: 16 November 2017
Proceedings, doi: 10.3390/ecws-2-04942
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract

Options to develop tanning industries could be hindered even in the presence of huge leather industry raw materials due to the requirements of high-tech contaminant removal technologies, especially in developing countries. This study was initiated to investigate the efficiency of freeze desalination for Cr(VI) removal using refrigerators to generate fresh water. Synthetic solutions that represent major ion compositions of drinking water as well as deionized water to which known concentrations of Cr(VI) spiked into it, were added and frozen in a closed freezer unit. The effects of different parameters such as initial concentration, freeze duration, ice nucleation, fraction of ice volume, and influence of co-occurring ions were evaluated in relation to the quality of produced ice. The physicochemical characteristics of the produced meltwater were also evaluated. A high total water recovery of up to 85% was achieved in the experimental evaluation. Cr(VI) removal efficiency of up to 80% from simulated tap and 93 to 97% for deionized water spiked with Cr(VI) were found in this batch partial freezing. Freeze desalination was found to be relatively viable desalination technology in terms of quality of water produced, options on the use of cost effective refrigerants and technologies which could have a pertinent importance to save energy consumption of freezers.

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